Sidhe Brewing Company – A First Look

Sidhe Brewery LogoIreland is dotted with small, earthen mounds called Sidhe [pronounced Shee] said to be the homes of the mythical folk called the Aos Sí [pronounced ees shee]. Part of Gaelic and Scottish mythology, these supernatural beings are believed to inhabit an invisible world that coexists with the world of humans. This otherworld is seen to be closer during the hours of dusk and dawn. The Aos Sí are fierce protectors of their abodes. The modern term Banshee derives from “Bean sídhe,” a particularly fearsome female spirit. In Gaelic folk belief and practice they are often appeased with offerings and are rarely referred to directly, but rather spoken of as “The Good Neighbors”, “The Fair Folk”, or simply “The Folk”.

Sidhe is also the name of one of St. Paul’s newest breweries. The name is appropriate. This is Minnesota’s second women owned brewery (at least as far as I know). It is also the state’s first Wiccan brewery – although not the only one to have a somewhat pagan slant.

With its grand opening in May, Sidhe Brewing Company added another facet to the quickly-developing, foodie-focused, Payne-Phalen neighborhood in East St. Paul. It is a neighborhood in transition. Higher-end food joints like Ward 6 and Tongue In Cheek coexist side-by-side with old-school, storefront taquerias. A multi-cultural mix of people can be seen on the streets and in the seats. For co-owner and head brewer Kathleen Culhane this sense of place is important. She sees Sidhe as a gathering place for the neighborhood’s diverse inhabitants – an “awesome, cool place for Eastsiders and others to hang out.” Culhane’s plan is to have a stable of six house beers with a small, rotating selection of seasonals and specialties. She is experimenting with reduced-gluten beers for those with sensitivities.

Sidhe Brewing EntranceThe brewery and taproom occupies the rear part of an interesting marketplace that includes a Mexican restaurant and several small vendor booths. The building is built into a hillside, which means that entering the taproom feels like you are headed to the basement. The entryway from Jenks Avenue affords a nice overview of the whole operation before you descend the stairs into the taproom.

The taproom space itself is simple and relatively unadorned. A set of paintings on the east wall hint at the Wiccan influence. Shelves of games – including to my delight Rock-‘Em Sock-‘Em Robots – insures patrons have plenty to occupy their time while sipping the suds. On the west end of the building is a stage that will host live music. The comparison isn’t totally apt, but while sitting there I kept thinking that the place has a kind of “your-uncle’s-basement-bar” vibe.

Sidhe Brewing BeersThe beers on my visit were a bit problematic. Apparent under-attenuation left each of them tasting overly sweet and a bit sticky. This impression was heightened by low carbonation. Beers that should have been dry and crisp were anything but. The 84 IBUs of Hopped Up McGonigal IPA were nearly completely overwhelmed by sugar. Culhane indicated to me that she was aware of the issues and was taking steps to rectify them. Hopefully she can get that figured out.

Of the selections available, the Best Kissed Cream Ale was my top pick. It was better attenuated than the others, giving it a more refreshing profile. Low, grainy malt flavor was accentuated by a touch of corn. Bitterness was almost just enough to balance. Light, spicy hop notes added a bit of zest. After my sampler flight I had a pint. It was an enjoyable pint.

Next for me was Greenman’s Harvest American Nut Brown. It too was a bit less sweet than the others. Rich and malty, it featured notes of caramel, chocolate, and a faint background of roast-malt bitterness that helped cut the sweet. Hop bitterness was moderate, with low, citrusy hop flavors riding gently over the top.

990 Payne Ave
St. Paul, MN 55130
612-424-1KEG (1534)

Thursday & Friday: 4-11 PM
Saturday: Noon to 11 PM
Sunday: Noon to 7 PM

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